Living with Disaster: Stories from Northeastern Japan

RonniThursday, October 23, 4 – 6 p.m.

University of Pittsburgh, Room 3431
Posvar Hall, 230 S. Bouquet St.
Oakland, 15213

Professor Ronni Alexander
Kobe University, Japan
Visiting fellow with the Center for Disaster Management at GSPIA
University of Pittsburgh

In March 2011, an earthquake and tsunami destroyed communities along 650 km of coastline in northeastern Japan. The ensuing Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant meltdowns spread radiation over a wide area, and thousands of people were forced to leave their homes. Three years later, many are still unable to return. The Pokoki Peace Project has been engaged in a voluntary project in the disaster area. This talk will introduce stories from the disaster area, providing an overview of the damage and present situation, and highlighting current concerns.

Ronni Alexander is a professor of transnational relations at the Graduate School of International Cooperation Studies, Kobe University. Her specialty is peace research, and the general theme of her work is finding ways for humans and other living things to both be, and feel, safe and secure. She is committed to peace scholarship, education and activism, and in 2006 began the Popoki Peace Project to explore the ways citizen artists and critical creative expression can be used in peace work. Since the 2011 disaster, the Project has also been engaged in a voluntary project called Popoki’s Friendship Story in the disaster area

Co-sponsored by Remembering Hiroshima, Imagining Peace, Center for Disaster Management, GSPIA, and the GSPIA Green Group.

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